Tag Archives: guernicamag.com

New with Guernica, Two Stories Every Two Weeks

For years, I made sure that Guernica ran at least one story, every two weeks.

Doing that worked well (very well in fact, we won many awards and published many top writers). But—and this was important—there were so many other stories we couldn’t publish because just didn’t have the space.

But now that’s changed: now we publish at least two stories, every two weeks, for a minimum of four stories a month.

This issue: fiction from Jamie Quatro; a story from evangelical America. A man suffering from depression gets an “anointing” of sacred oil.

And “Debriefing” from E.C. Osondu (who we’ve published before when he won the Caine Prize for African Writing). E.C.’s story is wonderful: it’s advice for illegal immigrants from Nigeria on how to make it here.

 

Peter Stamm on Guernica

I’m quite drunk at this point. I’m thinking he could do anything to me, and then straightaway I’m ashamed of the thought. He’s so young I could be his mother. I’d like to run my hand through his hair, press myself against him, and protect him in some way.

Peter Stamm has been getting a lot of acclaim lately. A couple of weeks ago, he was in The New Yorker.

And this week, he’s in Guernica. Read “Expectations,” and you’ll see why Stamm is so lauded: the stories tend to be deeply ordinary, about ordinary things, but they’re closely observed. It’s not the plot, but the form.

I wanted “Expectations” because the woman narrating it tells you so much about herself, her loneliness, without ever directly addressing it.

I’m thinking it might be one of the best stories we’ve ever run.

New Fiction on Guernica: Michael McGuire

Michael McGuire, who often writes about life on the American border, has one of his best pieces, ever, in Guernica called “Rosa de la Rosas.”

Michael is the author of a short story collection, The Ice Forest (Marlboro Press), named one of the “best books of the year” by Publisher’s Weekly. His stories have appeared in The Paris Review, The Hudson Review, New Directions in Prose & Poetry, and elsewhere.

His plays have been produced by the New York Shakespeare Festival, the Mark Taper Forum of Los Angeles, and at other theatres. They are published by Broadway Play Publishing.

Electric Literature on Guernica’s 6th Anniversary Party

Literary magazine of the moment, Electric Literature, writes about Guernica‘s 6th anniversary party.

It says someone stole the cheese. I know what happened: the intern stole (and then also drank) a lot of wine. She then passed the cheese around at the after party bar. It’s all a part of her payment plan–King Missile said it best as few years ago:

New Fiction on Guernica: Ethel Rohan

We’re going with two short-short pieces by Ethel Rohan. They’re sort-of, kind-of, about leaving and returning to Ireland. We don’t normally run micro-fiction, but I had to go with it, this time.

Ethel was raised in Ireland and now lives in San Francisco. Her story collection, Cut Through the Bone, will be released from Dark Sky Books this December. A second story collection, Hard to Say, is forthcoming from PANK, in 2011. She blogs at ethelrohan.com.

New Fiction on Guernica

I’m not sure how many fiction pieces I’ve edited at Guernica–maybe about 100 (an exhausting thing to contemplate).

This week, we have Leora Skolkin-Smith’s short story, “The Fragile Mistress,” which is an excerpt from the novel of the same name.

Provenance on this one is difficult: it’s an unpublished excerpt from a previously published novel (published by Grace Paley in 2005). That novel was called Edges.

The book has since been expanded to include other scenes that had been cut (you could call the newer version a writer’s cut, I suppose).

The novel was re-titled. Now it’s called The Fragile Mistress and will soon be published in the U.K.

Also, it will soon be a movie; it’s now in pre-production with Triboro Pictures and will be shot in the Middle East, along with New York and London.

What’s it about? Isreal and Jordan in 1963. A girl and her disappearance. Stuff of which great stories are made.

Read it here

Reading: Hosting Park-Lit in Union Sq

Park-Lit has a simple concept: writers read from their work,  outside, in a public park. At 6:30 on the 21st, Guernica (in association with Park-Lit) will be having a reading in Union Square Park. (On the south side, right in the thick of things, near the Washington statue).

The readers:
Joshua Kors (nonfiction)
Terese Svoboda (poetry)
Alexander Chee (fiction)

More about the readers and who they are (they’re fabulous, by the way) at the Park-Lit site.

PEN World Voices and Guernica: A recap

Novelist Claire Messud (who was guest-editor at Guernica recently) led a panel discussion on women, diversity, and literature at the 6th annual PEN World Voices Festival of World Literature.  I’ll let another Guernica writer Lorraine Adams sum up the event.

Here’s a film of the event, which was held at WNYC’s Greene Space, in lower Manhattan.

Claire Messud in Guernica

It’s been busy at Guernica. I’ve been working on a Claire Messud guest-edited section. It’s fantastic and suggest you read. The comments section is burning up. . .
Women make up 80 percent of the fiction reading audience in this country. So why, guest fiction editor Claire Messud asks, are women authors so frequently left off the best-of lists, and left out of prestigious book prizes?

The Caine Prize, E.C., and Me

I wrote about the the recent Caine Prize for African Writing award for the Guernica blog.

Spoiler Alert (not really, one could hardly be a surprised, I’d imagine, by what I wrote): I say that my favorite thing about the award is that the short story was unsolicited.

Read my essay about E.C. winning the Caine Prize for African Writing HERE

Read EC’s Guernica story HERE