Tag Archives: Guernica

Reading in Union Sq Today

Park-Lit has a simple concept: writers read from their work,  outside, in a public park. Today at 6:30 on the 21st, Guernica (in association with Park-Lit and Open City magazine) will be having a reading in Union Square Park. (On the south side, right in the thick of things, near the Washington statue). I’m not reading but acting as the MC for the event. The readers will be:

The readers:
Joshua Kors (nonfiction)
Terese Svoboda (poetry)
Alexander Chee (fiction)

More about the readers and who they are (they’re fabulous, by the way) at the Park-Lit site.

Reading: Hosting Park-Lit in Union Sq

Park-Lit has a simple concept: writers read from their work,  outside, in a public park. At 6:30 on the 21st, Guernica (in association with Park-Lit) will be having a reading in Union Square Park. (On the south side, right in the thick of things, near the Washington statue).

The readers:
Joshua Kors (nonfiction)
Terese Svoboda (poetry)
Alexander Chee (fiction)

More about the readers and who they are (they’re fabulous, by the way) at the Park-Lit site.

Cinema’s Beautiful Blowhard

The Beautiful Blowhard

I wrote an essay recommending Samuel Fuller’s work. A portion of what I said:

“A Fuller film careers between drama and melodrama; it stars scene-chewing actors; is low budget, and has the subtlety of a machete. A Fuller film can start out being about one thing (such as in one of my favorites, Crimson Kimono , where it begins in a Noirish vein, with two cops investigating a crime in 1950s L.A.) only to veer off somewhere else (racism against Asians). Watching a Fuller film is seeing the unpredictable. It breaks the rules of “good” writing—and just goes for the jugular. Continue reading Cinema’s Beautiful Blowhard

PEN World Voices and Guernica: A recap

Novelist Claire Messud (who was guest-editor at Guernica recently) led a panel discussion on women, diversity, and literature at the 6th annual PEN World Voices Festival of World Literature.  I’ll let another Guernica writer Lorraine Adams sum up the event.

Here’s a film of the event, which was held at WNYC’s Greene Space, in lower Manhattan.

Norman Rush: “Mating”

I wrote a piece on Norman Rush’s debut novel, Mating for Guernica’s blog.

“It took some convincing to get me to read Norman Rush. I expected his first novel, Mating, to be an obvious cross between Saul Bellow and a Victorian romance. It took me a long time to realize this: that’s not such a bad combination.”

Continue reading Norman Rush: “Mating”

Jakob Dylan: “Women and Country”

In which I bite the bullet (and recommend Jakob Dylan)

But first, I whine a bit about the Jakob juggernaut of years ago:

“Because of a former roommate, I shut the door on Jakob Dylan. While my roommate played Dylan’s hit, “One Headlight” repeatedly, I escaped to my bedroom where I could listen to something else. She sang random bars from his songs all day. She shattered the few quiet moments in the apartment to blather on about Dylan’s “cuteness.” Continue reading Jakob Dylan: “Women and Country”

Claire Messud in Guernica

It’s been busy at Guernica. I’ve been working on a Claire Messud guest-edited section. It’s fantastic and suggest you read. The comments section is burning up. . .
Women make up 80 percent of the fiction reading audience in this country. So why, guest fiction editor Claire Messud asks, are women authors so frequently left off the best-of lists, and left out of prestigious book prizes?

Guernica at Page Turner


November 14th, I’ll be at Page Turner, The Asian American Literary Festival. I’ll be introducing Guernica Guest fiction editors Amitava Kumar and V.V. Ganeshananthan, who will be conducting a reading, along with the writers who are featured in this week’s issue. the event will be held at Powerhouse Arena, the same place Guernica had its benefit (with David Byrne in the audience and Jonathan Ames on stage!)
Continue reading Guernica at Page Turner

The Caine Prize, E.C., and Me

I wrote about the the recent Caine Prize for African Writing award for the Guernica blog.

Spoiler Alert (not really, one could hardly be a surprised, I’d imagine, by what I wrote): I say that my favorite thing about the award is that the short story was unsolicited.

Read my essay about E.C. winning the Caine Prize for African Writing HERE

Read EC’s Guernica story HERE

New Fiction on Guernica, by Justo Arroyo

The Question,” by Justo Arroyo translated from Spanish by Seymour Menton

“Such fiery pupils—your immediate reaction is to avoid them. But the old man knows it, and he keeps looking at you until you have no other choice but to return his look, even when the fire in his eyes forces you to recognize his existence, which is exactly what it’s all about.”

Continue reading New Fiction on Guernica, by Justo Arroyo

New fiction on Guernica–from Marie Myung-Ok

It’s called “A Meeting,” which is Korean slang for “group date.”

Marie Myung-Ok Lee is the author of the novel, Somebody’s Daughter. Her fiction has appeared in The Kenyon Review, Witness, and TriQuarterly and has been short-listed for the O. Henry awards. Nonfiction has appeared in The New York Times, Newsweek, and The Washington Post. She is writer-in-residence at Brown University and also teaches there.

Do I need to mention once more that Esquire loves us?

New fiction on Guernica

The Memoirs and Prison Journal of Horace W. Redpole, 1793-1794
by Paul Gregory Himmelein

Grandmother was sprawled upon the couch in a heap of black crinoline; her shockingly white legs were raised in the air. Mr. Sparrow supported himself in a very precarious position and did not look the least bit comfortable but was busy grinding his privates into Grandmother’s, much like a mortar and pestle.