Tag Archives: Guernica Magazine

Caine Prize Winner Olufemi Terry on Guernica

Olufemi Terry, whose “Stickfighting Days” won the 2010 Caine Prize for African Writing, is in the current issue of Guernica. The story is brilliant, and it shows how if won Africa’s mst prestigious literary prize.

But it’s looong. . . can the Internet support long fiction? I hope so. It has to.

Any suggestions on how to feature long-form fiction? Send me a note if you have an idea. I’m committed to long fiction.

New Fiction on Guernica: Michael McGuire

Michael McGuire, who often writes about life on the American border, has one of his best pieces, ever, in Guernica called “Rosa de la Rosas.”

Michael is the author of a short story collection, The Ice Forest (Marlboro Press), named one of the “best books of the year” by Publisher’s Weekly. His stories have appeared in The Paris Review, The Hudson Review, New Directions in Prose & Poetry, and elsewhere.

His plays have been produced by the New York Shakespeare Festival, the Mark Taper Forum of Los Angeles, and at other theatres. They are published by Broadway Play Publishing.

Book Party for E.C. Osondu’s Voice of America in NYC

Where
The Gallery Bar, 120 Orchard St, New York, NY

When
Tuesday, November 2, 7–9 p.m.

E.C. Osondu
I picked his story, “Waiting” out of the slush pile. It went on to win the 2009 Caine Prize, Africa’s leading literary prize. (It beat out the Paris Review for the award.) The Chair of Judges, New Statesman Chief Sub-Editor Nana Yaa Mensah called it “a tour de force, powerfully written with not an ounce of fat on it—and deeply moving.”

You’re invited. It’s Free.

Jonathan Franzen and Mary Gaitskill on Osondu
“E.C. Osondu is a man with a clear head and a great ear, writing from crucial places.”—Jonathan Franzen, author of Freedom and The Corrections.

“With observant wonder and subtle humor, [Osondu] portrays…our unique capacity for hope and hopelessness rolled together.” —Mary Gaitskill, author of Bad Behavior and Veronica

My PR Quote on the party
Guernica is proud to have been a vital part of E.C. Osondu’s career—after all, that’s why our editors work on the magazine. We want to showcase the unexpected, whether its fiction, poetry, or hard-hitting nonfiction. But also, we love to host a variety of cultural events, from Pen World Voices to our get-together salons. This book party for E.C. promises to be one of our best.”

Browse inside his book, here.

Electric Literature on Guernica’s 6th Anniversary Party

Literary magazine of the moment, Electric Literature, writes about Guernica‘s 6th anniversary party.

It says someone stole the cheese. I know what happened: the intern stole (and then also drank) a lot of wine. She then passed the cheese around at the after party bar. It’s all a part of her payment plan–King Missile said it best as few years ago:

New Fiction on Guernica: Ethel Rohan

We’re going with two short-short pieces by Ethel Rohan. They’re sort-of, kind-of, about leaving and returning to Ireland. We don’t normally run micro-fiction, but I had to go with it, this time.

Ethel was raised in Ireland and now lives in San Francisco. Her story collection, Cut Through the Bone, will be released from Dark Sky Books this December. A second story collection, Hard to Say, is forthcoming from PANK, in 2011. She blogs at ethelrohan.com.

New Fiction on Guernica

I’m not sure how many fiction pieces I’ve edited at Guernica–maybe about 100 (an exhausting thing to contemplate).

This week, we have Leora Skolkin-Smith’s short story, “The Fragile Mistress,” which is an excerpt from the novel of the same name.

Provenance on this one is difficult: it’s an unpublished excerpt from a previously published novel (published by Grace Paley in 2005). That novel was called Edges.

The book has since been expanded to include other scenes that had been cut (you could call the newer version a writer’s cut, I suppose).

The novel was re-titled. Now it’s called The Fragile Mistress and will soon be published in the U.K.

Also, it will soon be a movie; it’s now in pre-production with Triboro Pictures and will be shot in the Middle East, along with New York and London.

What’s it about? Isreal and Jordan in 1963. A girl and her disappearance. Stuff of which great stories are made.

Read it here

Guernica’s second PEN World Voices event is tomorrow

It’s called “Leaving Home” and I’ll be introducing it.
Austrian Cultural Forum: 11 East 52nd St.

5:30–6:30 p.m.

With György Dragomán, Dinaw Mengestu, and Saša Stanišić; moderated by Irina Reyn

Free and open to the public; reservations required.

For reservations, call ACF at (212) 319-5300, ext. 222, or e-mail reservations@acfny.org


Guernica: A Magazine of Art and Politics hosts a panel with debut novelists Dinaw Mengestu, György Dragomán, and Saša Stanišić, whose narrators recount escaping violence in their home countries only to be fraught with feelings of ambivalence in their adopted countries. Moderated by Irina Reyn, whose debut novel, What Happened to Anna K., will be published in August 2008, the panel will explore children as witnesses, the status of exile, and the role of fiction as a voice for multiculturalism.

New fiction in Guernica magazine


Jane Wong’s “The Loves of Mao” examines the price of love, loyalty, and groupthink in Cultural Revolution China. Jane is in China right now on a Fulbright, and was a Bread Loaf Writer’s Conference waiter the year before I was.

Zachary Mason, author of The author of The Lost Books of the Odyssey, and winner of the 4th Annual Starcherone Prize for Innovative Fiction, has a piece from his novel-in-progress, The Machine Edda. Zachary is a computer scientist and a follower of Borges. His Lost Books is a great book deserving of a much larger readership. It’s based on the conceit that there are lost, Dead Sea Scroll-like parchments of the Odyssey.

On Thursday, we’ll have fiction from PEN World Voices participant, Sasa Stanisic, from his upcoming Grove Press novel, How the Soldier Repairs the Gramophone, translated by Anthea Bell.

Tomorrow night: Guernica and Pen World Voices

Guernica magazine is sponsoring two PEN World Voices events.

Tuesday, April 29th
Crisis Darfur: A Conversation with Mia Farrow and Bernard-Henri Lévy
8 p.m.: The French Institute, Alliance Française ($15/$10 students)

Friday, May 2nd
Leaving Home: With Dinaw Mengestu, György Dragomán, and Saša Stanišić. Moderated by Irina Reyn. 5:30 p.m.: Austrian Cultural Forum (FREE, but reservations required).

Click HERE for more information.

Intro film on Pen World Voices

Guernica and Pen World Voices

Guernica magazine is sponsoring two PEN World Voices events.

Tuesday, April 29th
Crisis Darfur: A Conversation with Mia Farrow and Bernard-Henri Lévy
8 p.m.: The French Institute, Alliance Française ($15/$10 students)

Friday, May 2nd
Leaving Home: With Dinaw Mengestu, György Dragomán, and Saša Stanišić. Moderated by Irina Reyn. 5:30 p.m.: Austrian Cultural Forum (FREE, but reservations required).

Click HERE for more information.

New Fiction in Guernica Magazine


* Susan Daitch’s “All that is Solid” asks, what would it be like to work in the Empire State Building if/when another great ape decides to climb it?

Susan read this story at the Brooklyn Public Library (a reading she did with Ben Marcus) and gave Guernica a shout-out. Thanks Susan.

* A new story by Amy Brill, “Something so Nice for Nobody,” thrusts the reader into a world filled with people struggling to find love.