Category Archives: Travel Writing

Pessoa’s Birthday and Soon: Off to Lisbon

Happy Birthday, Fernando Pessoa

Life is an experimental journey undertaken involuntarily. ‎It is a journey of the spirit through the material world and, since it is the spirit that travels, it is in the spirit that it is experienced. That is why there exist contemplative souls who have lived more intensely, more widely, more tumultuously than others who have lived their lives purely externally. The end result us what matters. What one felt was what one experienced. . . One never lives so intensely as when one has been thinking hard.” – The Book of Disquiet

Pessoa is a favorite writer and his birthday is in line with what’s going on with me: I’m heading off to Lisbon shortly to speak at the Dzanc Books/CNC DISQUIET International Literary Program, July 1-13 as a Guest Editor.

Meantime, working on some more of those infographics I’d posted about earlier . . .

My Google Maps Piece is up

As noted earlier, I wrote a piece for The Atlantic, using Google Maps.

It was a highly complex project and difficult to execute–I wrote pithy listings for some 125 spots all over the world. I also provided the client with Google map locations and art work (I volunteered for that, a bit to my shame).

It damned near killed me (there were many, many sleepless nights while I worked on this project), but the results look great. And it’s a popular feature, too!

You can find my Google Maps feature on The Atlantic Website.

Writing on Deadline, Using Google Maps

Under deadline, there just isn’t time to be uninspired. I’m writing a dynamic, online piece that’s about some 25 restaurants in six different cities. Aimed at the business traveler, it uses Flash and it’s all linked to Google Maps. When this thing is done, it should be amazing.

Now, back to Nexis, ProQuest, and Factiva (and my notes from my own travels).

By the way, Google Maps has a sharp picture of my backyard. I don’t have access to that yard (I only have the view). But from the satellite photo, I can see more of the yard than I can from my own window.

And I can also see my rooftop. I don’t have access to my New York City building’s roof. But I now know what it looks like. I now know that my neighbors have a garden on the top of theirs.

Thank you, satellite from outer space for telling me what’s next door.