Category Archives: Fiction

PEN World Voices and Guernica: A recap

Novelist Claire Messud (who was guest-editor at Guernica recently) led a panel discussion on women, diversity, and literature at the 6th annual PEN World Voices Festival of World Literature.  I’ll let another Guernica writer Lorraine Adams sum up the event.

Here’s a film of the event, which was held at WNYC’s Greene Space, in lower Manhattan.

Reading: Happy Ending, Feb. 11th

Thursday, 8:00 pm. Happy Ending, at 302 Broome St., between Forsyth and Eldridge.

It’s free. Happy Ending is a great bar with an interesting history: it used to be a “massage” parlor (hence the name). They’ve kept the exterior and some of the gear intact, but otherwise, it’s a fancy place.

Here’s the info on the reading:

Continue reading Reading: Happy Ending, Feb. 11th

Reading: Tandem Readings, January 17th

Looks like I’m taking part in Tandem Readings’ monthly reading series at CELL THEATRE on the 17th.

It’ll be with some great people: Irina Reyn, I introduced at a PEN World Voices event that Guernica sponsored a while back, and damn, she’s good.

Jonathan Miles a friend (just last night) was telling me is amazing. supposedly, his book is hilarious. And I’ve heard good things about Jonathan Tel, too.

Continue reading Reading: Tandem Readings, January 17th

The Caine Prize, E.C., and Me

I wrote about the the recent Caine Prize for African Writing award for the Guernica blog.

Spoiler Alert (not really, one could hardly be a surprised, I’d imagine, by what I wrote): I say that my favorite thing about the award is that the short story was unsolicited.

Read my essay about E.C. winning the Caine Prize for African Writing HERE

Read EC’s Guernica story HERE

New fiction on Guernica–from Marie Myung-Ok

It’s called “A Meeting,” which is Korean slang for “group date.”

Marie Myung-Ok Lee is the author of the novel, Somebody’s Daughter. Her fiction has appeared in The Kenyon Review, Witness, and TriQuarterly and has been short-listed for the O. Henry awards. Nonfiction has appeared in The New York Times, Newsweek, and The Washington Post. She is writer-in-residence at Brown University and also teaches there.

Do I need to mention once more that Esquire loves us?

What Men Want: a new book of poetry


Friend, fellow Bread Loafer, and Guernica author Laura McCullough has a new book of poetry, WHAT MEN WANT.

I’ll just let the flap copy say it, because it says it pretty well: Laura’s poems “traverse the divide between the body and the mind, the sexual and the elegiac, with alacrity and intelligence.”

This is Laura McCullough’s second collection of poems. Her third, SPEECH ACTS, is forthcoming from Black Lawrence Press in 2010.

Cornelia Street Cafe: Reading Tomorrow, December 16th

I’m doing a reading on the 16th at Cornelia Street Cafe along with Thaddeus Rutkowski and Alison Summers.

From the Cornelia Street PR:

Meakin Armstrong will read his short story “Gigantic” Meakin Armstrong is a screenwriter, magazine editor, fiction editor of Guernica (guernicamag.com) and a freelance writer working on his first novel. For 2007, he received a Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference work-study “waitership.” Meakin is also contributor to the book, New York Calling: From Blackout to Bloomberg (Dist U of Chicago Press, 2007). Most recently, his work appeared in Mr. Beller’s Neighborhood. His work will also be featured in an upcoming book on movies.

Thaddeus Rutkowski will read his works “Smoking” and “Recovery is for Quitters”. Thaddeus Rutkowski is a graduate of Cornell University and The Johns Hopkins University. He is the author of the novels Tetched (Behler Publications) and Roughhouse (Kaya Press). Both books were finalists for an Asian American Literary Award. He has been the fiction editor of the literary magazine Many Mountains Moving since 2007. He teaches fiction writing at the Writer’s Voice of the West Side YMCA in Manhattan and has taught at Pace University, the Hudson Valley Writers Center and the Asian American Writers Workshop.

Alison Summers will read from her work-in-progress Predator. Alison Summers´ first play Punch me in the Stomach co-written with Deb Filler premiered at the New York Theatre Workshop in 1992. Since then she has written freelance journalism for newspapers including The Times in London, The Australian and Sydney Morning Herald. She has edited several novels which have won literary prizes, and is now writing her first novel.

Cover $7 (includes one house drink)

InDigest fiction

The fine folks at Indigestmag.com have put up a short story of mine, The Missing Years. It’s from a novel I’ve been working on. The story is an early draft.

It’s so good to read something from the novel. At least it’s good for me, because lately I’ve been writing stories inspired by 1990s power ballads. The stories vary wildly from the novel (for one thing, the “power ballad” stories are meant to be funny).

Maybe I should stick with the novel? The novel is set in the South. The power ballad stories are, too, but. . . I digress.

InDigest is such a nice magazine. Take a look.